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Commitment: Thoughts on Psalm 101

psalm 101.jpgWhat does it really mean to have a relationship with God?

A “relationship” can be such undefined terminology. I have a relationship with chocolate. We see each other often. Daily, usually.

What puts my interactions with God on a different plane than that?

Obviously it makes a difference that God loves me back. But just try to tell my taste buds that chocolate isn’t filled with affection for me. The feeling sure seems mutual.

One distinction that comes to mind about what a relationship with God can and should mean is something we don’t often talk about.

Commitment.

God is committed to us. His love never lets go.

What does it look like for us to be committed to Him?

I wonder if it looks something like Psalm 101.

Because when I read the “I will…” followed by “I will…” followed by “I will…,” I can’t help but think of wedding vows.

And though I might have chosen different vows than the ones made by David, that doesn’t throw me off too much. After all, we live in different countries and cultures thousands of years apart from one another. And, have very different roles. He was a king after all, and I am not a queen of anything but clumsiness.

But, I hear his commitment and I respect it. He is making promises to God about how He will live.

If this is a contract kind of situation, which is how I have sometimes read it, this doesn’t feel very loving. If David is committing to do these things because of what he will get in return, or out of fear of what will happen if he doesn’t do them, then this Psalm feels like shallow religion.

But what if it is more like wedding vows? What if they are a voicing of David’s desire to please the One he loves? What if David is fully aware that he will fail at some of these things, but wants to try anyway? What if David knows these promises might not be the 100% correct theology, but is more worried about the heart than the accuracy?

I will sing of your love and justice;
to you, LORD, I will sing praise.
I will be careful to lead a blameless life—
when will you come to me?
I will conduct the affairs of my house
with a blameless heart.
I will not look with approval
on anything that is vile.
– Psalm 101:1-3

If I read this Psalm as wedding vows, I can see something in it for me. I can find inspiration to speak my commitment to God, and hear His commitment to me.

We are in this together, God and I. I am committed to Him, for better or for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish as long as I shall live.


This will be my last post for a few weeks.I am taking a blogging break. After making it to 100 Psalms (yeah!) I realized that I have been burning myself out on content-creation, and need some space to work on some brewing projects in other areas of my life. Please join back with me for Psalms series and other posts in early June.


Link up with your own reflection on Psalm 101 below.

What I have learned in 100 Psalms

Psalm 100More than 2 years ago, I made the decision to blog my way through the Psalms, in order. Today marks a milestone.

Today is Psalm 100.

I have taken a few breaks, and had a few guest posts, but otherwise, I’ve been writing consistently. For more than two years, I have returned to the Psalms week after week to see how this ancient song book might speak to my faith and my life.

It has been a sometimes encouraging, sometimes frustrating, sometimes inspiring, and sometimes infuriating journey.

It has also been unexpectedly amazing. In the last two and a half years, I have moved to across states, changed jobs (twice), watched my oldest start school, said goodbye to old friends and waved hello to new ones, and through it all, the Psalms have been my constant companion. They are a warm and tattered blanket for my soul.


Today I read the words of Psalm 100, words I have read many other times in my life. But as I look at them now, I realize how differently I see the words in light of the 99 psalms leading up to their message.

Psalm 100 is a praise Psalm. It is filled with the kind of phrases that can be used as empty platitudes over a worshipping space, pressing people to forget the hard stuff of life and put on their smiling faces.

Unless you read the first 99.

The first 99 help us see how the worshipping community has fought their way into this place of praise.

Shout for joy to the LORD, all the earth.
Worship the LORD with gladness;
come before him with joyful songs. –Psalm 100:1-2

That though they now shout for joy, they have just as often (if not more often) cried out in grief and despair.

Know that the LORD is God.
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, the sheep of his pasture. – Psalm 100:3

That though they now sound confident in the Lord, they have just as often (if not more often) wondered if He had abandoned them.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving
and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise his name. –Psalm 100:4

That though they now enter his courts with praise, they have just as often (if not more often) longed for the day when they would have that closeness with him again.

For the LORD is good and his love endures forever;
his faithfulness continues through all generations. –Psalm 100:5

The Psalms declare that the Lord is good, but they never say that life is easy.
The Psalms proclaim that God’s love endures, but they never claim that pain isn’t its constant companion.
The Psalms are the hymns of humanity, weaving through brokenness and beauty in parallel to the experience of our lives.

The Message of Psalms

The Psalms give us permission to approach God as we are, and know that we are welcome. Whether we come with ugly prayers of vengeance or stunning desires of commitment, we are embraced in the never-ending love of our Father.

I, for one, am grateful for that.


In honor of this milestone, I thought I would highlight some of Psalms in the first 100 of this series.

5 of the Most Popular:

5 of My Favorites:

5 of the Most Frustrating (Since the Psalms aren’t all roses and flowers, I want this recap list to reflect the wrestling…)

Also in honor of this milestone, I’d like to thank all those who’ve joined me along the way. First and foremost, for all of you who have read along as I have pushed my way forward on this crazy adventure. Second, to all who have joined me on any of the link ups, including Perfect Number, Kirsten, Brenna, Ben, Jennifer, Marvia, Brandy, Abby, and Janice. (I really hope I didn’t miss anyone). Thank you for being part of this with me.

100 down, 50 more to go…


I would love it if you would link up with your own reflection of Psalm 100 below. And stop back next week with thoughts on Psalm 101. Also, if you have participated as a reader or writer, I would love it if you would celebrate with me and comment with any of your reflections or favorites from the first 100.

Life after Easter

He is risen

Not so many days ago
We heard the phrase repeated
Again and again.
“He is risen.”

What does that mean now
When the Easter holiday has passed
And regular life has begun again?

Is it a phrase that means something on other days?
Or is it only for the one time a year
When we speak it with conscious awareness
Of the celebration?

After Easter,
Is Christ now back in the grave?
Like a religious jack-in-the-box
Waiting for us to turn the crank
And set Him free
To the tune of
“Christ the Lord is Risen Today”?

That’s how we treat Him sometimes.

I don’t think we know what to do with the resurrection.

It sounds all happy and victorious
For a day.
But go much longer
And it can start to sound a little too
Supernatural.

“He is risen.”

It is much safer to confine that phrase,
Those words,
That reminder,
To one day
Than to keep its thought
At the forefront of our minds
And force us to wrestle with its weight.

It is a statement that asks a question.
If Jesus is risen, then what will we do?
And what will Jesus do in response?

If we hide,
Cowering in the upper room
Of our own fears,
Jesus breathes on us
And tells us to
Receive His Spirit.

If we walk away,
Traveling far from what it calls us to,
Jesus strolls beside us
And quietly explains
The Scriptures concerning Him.

If we go back to our old jobs,
To the boat that feels constant under our feet,
Jesus calls us out,
Makes us breakfast,
And pushes us
To live out our love.

He is risen
And He is relentless.

Jesus is calling us to live
As a risen people.
A people who
Find the hiding.
Walk with the hurting.
Seek after the truth.
Deliver grace.
Cook breakfast.
Live boldly.
Love.

He is risen.

God is great, and yet…

Psalm 99Many humans function with the agenda of “and so…”

We have a platform, and so… we try to keep it.
We don’t have a platform, and so… we strive to find it.

We have power, and so… we use it.
We don’t have power, and so… we seek it.

Whatever we do have, we fear losing.
Whatever we don’t have, we fear not getting.

And so… we walk through our lives grasping.

God does not grasp.

He does not respond to His own greatness with the agenda of “and so…”

God responds to His greatness with the freedom of “and yet…”

God is the biggest player on the world’s stage.

The LORD reigns,
let the nations tremble;
he sits enthroned between the cherubim,
let the earth shake. –Psalm 99:1

God mighty beyond compare.

Great is the LORD in Zion;
he is exalted over all the nations. –Psalm 99:2

God is holy, set apart, in a category all His own.

Exalt the LORD our God
and worship at his footstool;
he is holy. –Psalm 99:5

Truly, He is worthy of any worship we bring to Him.

God could grasp for that worship, like a power hungry dictator looking for grovelers to validate His ego, and yet…

When we come into God’s presence, it is not a one-way interchange.

He could choose only to receive praise, and yet… He responds with care for us.

they called on the LORD
and he answered them.
He spoke to them from the pillar of cloud; -Psalm 99:6-7

God is set apart, and yet… He reaches down, answers us, and forgives us.

LORD our God,
you answered them;
you were to Israel a forgiving God –Psalm 99:8

God is holy, and yet… He forgives the sins of His people.
God is powerful, and yet… He enters this world in humility.
God is justice, and yet… He covers our misdeeds with grace.
God is great, and yet… He chooses to love.

May we learn to respond with “and yet…” instead of “and so…” in our own lives.


That was my reflection on Psalm 99. Link up with your own thoughts below. Or stop back next week with thoughts on Psalm 100. (I have almost blogged my way through 100 Psalms! Whoa.)

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